Privacy Policy and Service Terms
We Respect Your Privacy.

Only approved listings will be published online and naturally you should expect that all or
part of the data submitted to us when you requested to get listed in our directory will be
edited, shared and published through this web site and affiliate process service
directories. All the information collected on this site may become public and you agree
and understand that you  should not have special expectations regarding information
privacy about the data you submitted.  If you do not wish certain information to be
published, please do not include it when you fill out the listing request.

It make take additional time to get your  process service business listed if we need
additional time to verify the information and/or credentials you have submitted.

Conditions and Service Terms.

Most requests for listings are accepted. However, your listing may be rejected for any
reason, including, but not limited to: incomplete form, misrepresentation, lack of
credentials, lack of contact information, lack of an office address, zip code only address,
lack of your own web site domain, etc. . We reserve the right to deny any listing
submission and we reserve the right to place your listing only where we believe it should
placed. We may use your listing information to add your process service business to
other directories without notifying you.

If you have further questions or if you need more information, please contact us. The best
way to contact us is by email or by regular mail.   

Thank you,  

For State Process Service Organization,

The Editors.

StateDirectory@aol.com  

Phone 718-345-0244
Fax: 347-295-0244

Email:
StateDirectory@aol.com  

ADDRESS FOR REGULAR MAIL:  
The State Process Service Organization
54 Bristol St., Suite 7F
Brooklyn, New York 11212.


A Free Process Server Directory for the Public and for Legal
Providers

This national process server directory ,compiled and reviewed by human editors, lists
process servers and constables serving process in United States by state, county and
city. Also included are most independent registered individual private process servers
and nationwide licensed process service agencies.

We do not charge any fees per listing because our goal is to deliver accurate
information. To search for US process servers, just click on the corresponding state or
city.
state process service organization official logo
Process Server America
                  
              Top Ten Mistakes Process Servers Make ...Sometimes.

    1. Not making copies of the documents to be served. If you have a summons and you   
       serve it but you do not have an extra copy how will you be able to prepare the affidavit of
 service? You must know the index number and have the correct caption.

    2.  Failing to keep detailed records. All professional process servers must generate
    detailed records of their process serving activities: dates, times, description of
    defendants, description of the property where service was attempted, etc.

    3.  Not iPhone Battery Back Up. Even though iPhones and other smart phones used to
    report service attempts are very reliable, sometimes they do die unexpectedly because of
    battery failure, specially if you also use them to talk.  Also telephone signals do not always
    work in certain areas. Professional process servers must be ready to deal with these
    types of inconveniences. A battery back up must always be available.

    4.  Getting Involved with Recipient of Process. No matter how much that pretty girl cried
    when you served her with the divorce papers, you should still behave in a professional
    manner. Do not take advantage, do not give advice, do not get involved in situations, do
    not  try to find the love of your life while serving process.

    5.  Causing More Anger and Pain or Arguing with the Defendant. When serving legal
    documents, process servers must be very respectful and understand that the recipients
    of process may already hold a grudge against the person(s) or entities suing them.
    Process servers must approach defendants/recipients of process respectfully and they
    must refrain from using foul or unacceptable language which could cause defendants to
    get angrier or more depressed.

    6.  Not Being Discreet. Good process servers try to keep the nature of their visits and the
    nature of the documents to be served as private as possible. Sharing said information
    with curious third parties (the defendant's door man, his secretary, his partner, or his
    friend) may trigger unexpected reactions and consequences. Furthermore the element of
    surprise always favors process servers because if the defendant finds out that you are
    coming with the child support order he may choose to make himself unavailable in order
    to avoid service. After all process servers are unwelcome about 95% of the times they
    effect or try to effect service of process.   

    7.  Losing Control of the Situation.  Sometimes defendants will shout, release their
    dogs, threaten you, ask the you to leave, point guns at you, or even call the police. A
    process server must remain calm at all times and do his job no matter what the
    defendant does or says.

    8.  Calling the Defendant Ahead. This is similar to "not being discreet". Calling the
    defendant to inform her that you intend to serve her is usually a major mistake.  Your
    actions will give the defendant an opportunity to think and prepare for evasion of service of
    process.

    9.  Not Being Fast Enough. Good process servers must be fast enough to take notes, to
    effect service and to get out of the scene before confrontation or second thoughts occur.
    When the defendant is still undecided, the service must be done and the process server
    must leave promptly in order to avoid having to deal with a shocked defendant who may
    decide that she does not want the divorce papers after all..

    10.  Being Arrogant and Impractical. Don't think that because you have a very good car
    you can serve every defendant in New York, NY (heavy car traffic won't allow that). Don't
    consider yourself a government/court employee because you happen to be assigned to
    deliver court papers. Don't think you can enter places without getting arrested for
    trespassing. Don't be sure that doing illegal surveillance cannot lead to arrest. Don't
    assume that security guards, door men, concierges and other people who stand between
    you and the defendant do not know the law. They are also taking notes and filming you
    too. They too may get you.